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Yang-Style Medium Speed - Part 3

Part 3 is the final section for training Taijiquan at medium speed (中速, zhōngsù). Students are expected to perform techniques smoothly, efficiently, and confidently while employing all of the principles and skills learned in earlier training. Although medium speed practice does not focus on partner training, students will be expected to demonstrate a strong knowledge of how martial applications relate to the movements at this level of intensity and speed.
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Borrowing Jin

Borrowing Jin (借勁, jièjìn) is a reaction and sensitivity drill. You must detect and deflect your opponent's push before its power is fully manifested.
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Taijiquan Martial Applications 3

There are more than 200 fighting techniques in the Yang-style Long Form. In Taijiquan Martial Applications 3 (太極拳應用三, Tàijíquán yìngyòng sān), you must analyze, deconstruct, and demonstrate martial applications of movements from the third part of the Yang-style traditional form. Each application must contain at least one technique from each of the 4 fighting categories: kicking, punching, wrestling, and Chin Na.
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Yang-Style Fast Speed - Part 2

Fast speed (快速, kuàisù) Taijiquan is practiced for developing a stronger sense of opponent and martial intent. The movements need to be performed at a speed that is practical for combat. Students should manifest soft Jin for offense and firmly rooted neutralizing Jin for defense. This level focuses on the second part of the form.
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Silk Reeling 2

Yang-side (Moving)
Tai Chi Silk Reeling practice (太極圈纏手練習, Tàijí quānchánshǒu liànxí) is an important foundation to Taiji Pushing Hands and Taiji Sparring. It is also known as Tai Chi symbol training, or Yin-Yang Sticking Hands. A competent level will allow a practitioner to smoothly transition from one technique to another. In this level, students must practice the Yang-side of the form with Bagua circling (八卦圈, bāguàquān). Direction changes should also incorporate kicking.
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Cai Lie Zhou Kao

International Routine
Cai Lie Zhou Kao (採肘靠, čǎi liè zhǒu kào) is another popularly practiced international double pushing hands routine. Cai (pluck), Lie (rend), Zhou (elbow), and Kao (bump) are the next 4 Taijiquan postures after Peng, Lü, Ji, and An.
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Pushing Hands Applications 1

Stationary (Semi-Cooperative)
In Pushing Hands Applications 1 (推手之應用一, tuīshǒu zhī yìngyòng yī), students must successfully execute 5 techniques from a stationary double pushing hands situation, where the opponent is semi-cooperative. Each application must contain at least one technique from each of the 4 fighting categories: kicking, punching, wrestling, and Chin Na.