1

San Cai Dui Jian

Three Powers Sword Matching
San Cai Dui Jian (三才對劍, sāncái duìjiàn) means “Three Powers Sword Matching” and is a 2-person Northern Shaolin Long Fist sword versus sword form. It naturally follows the practice of San Cai Jian, the solo version. The first and second halves of San Cai Jian actually match each other in exchanging offensive and defensive techniques. Through this practice, students will gain a better understanding of sword applications.
2

San Cai Jian

Three Powers Sword
San Cai Jian (三才劍, sāncáijiàn) means “Three Powers Sword” and is a Northern Shaolin Long Fist sword form. The three powers are what the Chinese consider to be the three most powerful forces in this world: Heaven, Earth, and Man. San Cai Jian is a basic yet well-known sequence in Long Fist. The Chinese straight sword is very flexible, so the application of Qigong techniques are necessary to defend against heavier, longer, or stronger weapons.
3

Jian Fa Dui Lian

Swordplay Practice
Jiandan Jianfa Duilian (簡單劍法對練, jiǎndān jiànfǎ duìliàn) means “Simple Swordplay Practice” and is an exercise for evaluating a student's understanding of the Chinese sword. With a partner, students must create 5 short repeating routines that demonstrate offensive and defensive techniques based in correct sword theory.
4

Taizu Changquan

Taizu Long Fist
Taizu Changquan (太祖長拳, Tàizǔ chángquán) means “Taizu Long Fist” and is an advanced Northern Shaolin Long Fist form. It is said that Emperor Taizu created this sequence in the Song Dynasty. The techniques should enhance a student's Long Fist knowledge and abilities.
5

Jian-Dao Fa Duilian

Sword Saber Matching Practice
Jiandan Jian-Dao Fa Duilian (簡單劍刀法對練, jiǎndān jiàndāofǎ duìliàn) means “Simple Sword Saber Matching Practice” and is an exercise for evaluating a student's understanding of the sword and saber. With a partner, students must create 5 short repeating routines that demonstrate offensive and defensive techniques based in each weapon.
6

Bai He

White Crane
Bai He (白鶴, báihè) simply means “White Crane.” This barehand form is a compilation of 4 Shaolin White Crane sequences: Qi Xing, Shan He, Gong He, and Ba Mei Shou. It introduces typical White Crane techniques and Jin patterns.